Tower Bridge will be closed to vehicles for three months from October to allow structural repair and maintenance works to take place.

The pedestrian part will be closed for three weekends during the work when a free replacement ferry service will be provided.

The City of London Corporation said it will be working closely with TfL and the London Boroughs of Southwark and Tower Hamlets to minimise disruption with “comprehensive traffic management plans”.

More than 40,000 people cross over Tower Bridge every day including 21,000 vehicles.

This daily heavy use has had an effect on the timber decking of the bridge which was last refurbished in the 1970s.

Significant operations in the schedule of work will include:

  • Replacement of the decking on the bascules
  • Corrosion prevention and repair operations
  • Replacement of worn expansion joints
  • Resurfacing of fixed roads and walkways
  • Waterproofing of approach viaducts
  • Overhaul/maintenance of key mechanical and lift components
  • General cleaning/repairs to the towers, as well as replacement of river navigation and traffic signal lights

Chris Hayward, Chairman of the Planning and Transport Committee said: “This decision to close Tower Bridge to vehicles has not been taken lightly, and this course of action has been taken after extensive consultation and planning in conjunction with numerous stakeholders.

“We will use this time to repair, refurbish, and upgrade London’s most iconic bridge, which has gone without significant engineering works for more than thirty-five years.

“We will work hard to minimise disruption to both pedestrians and motor vehicles, and the bridge’s viewing walkways and exhibitions will stay open for the entirety of the works.”

Leon Daniels, Managing Director of Surface Transport at TfL, said: “We’ve been working closely with the City of London to minimise the impact of the vital refurbishment of Tower Bridge and to ensure that Londoners have the travel advice they need.

“Our advice to those traveling in the area is to check before they travel and to plan an alternative route or allow more time for their journeys as roads will be busier than usual.”

Via Construction Enquirer. View original article here.