Parents have been urged to promote careers in the house-building industry to their children, with research pointing to great opportunities for progression.
Past CITB studies have shown that 38% of people who embark on house-building apprenticeships reach managerial level, while seven in 10 entering the construction industry stay there until they retire.

However, new polling from the NHBC Foundation has warned that four in 10 parents would not encourage their youngsters to consider careers in the house-building trade.

The group, which acts as the research arm of the National House Building Council, indicates that parents may be preventing children from entering a thriving industry which is benefiting from strong demand.

Some 29% of the parents with children under the age of 10 said they would not promote house-building careers to them, with this figure rising to 42% among those whose offspring are 11 or older.

The NHBC Foundation said 60% of parents are keen for their children to benefit from good pay and opportunities for career progression in their future jobs, with 51% keen for them to do something worthwhile.

NHBC chief executive Mike Quinton said house-building can offer all of these things. He said: “Parents play a major role in influencing and informing their children about future career choices … With demand for high-quality new houses at high levels, there has never been a better time to begin a career in house-building.”

In an effort to promote the opportunities available in the house-building sector, a new online film has now been launched by the foundation, using Lego characters.

The NHBC Foundation has pointed out that four major house-building firms are currently listed on the FTSE 100 – highlighting the sector’s clout.

But it said the industry is facing skills shortages at present, with figures from the Office for National Statistics indicating that it has around 20,000 job vacancies.

Mr Quinton said: “We hope that our new online film encourages more parents and young people to consider a career in one of the UK’s most thriving and successful industries.”

Via CITB. View original article here.