Make Architects has completed this office building facing the Grade I-listed Monument to the Great Fire of London in the City.

The nine-storey scheme replaces three 1960s buildings which previously stood on the site.

The scheme features a series of terraces while the office floor plates have been maximised through the use of a single stair core.

It features full height twisted anodised aluminium fins which act as solar shading on the south façade reducing gains by more than 20 per cent.

Make Architects has completed this office building facing the Grade I-listed Monument to the Great Fire of London in the City

The nine-storey scheme replaces three 1960s buildings which previously stood on the site.

The scheme features a series of terraces while the office floor plates have been maximised through the use of a single stair core.

It features full height twisted anodised aluminium fins which act as solar shading on the south façade reducing gains by more than 20 per cent.

This was a complex site that required some innovative solutions to maximise accommodation. We have replaced three buildings with one, rationalising the area and delivering BREEAM Excellent offices in the heart of the City. The new building improves Monument Yard and provides a modern stage setting for the Monument.

Out of the constraints of the site Make has maximised the floorplates by installing a single stair core – an unusual tactic due to the need for alternative exits in case of fire. Working alongside Arup, a pressurised air system has been installed into the core protected by a fire proof wall to suck the air out of the core to prevent smoke and fire travelling through the ductwork.

The roofspace, at 9m below the viewing platform of the Monument has been described as the fifth elevation of The Monument Building. Two thirds of the roof is planted with sedums in a range of colours to echo the strata of a sundial, PV panels are located over 125m² of brown roof and louvres hide the ceiling plant and cooling equipment from visitors at the top of the Monument.

Via Architect Journal. View full article here.